Automatically upgrading user settings after an application version change

Suppose you’re building a .NET desktop or console application and are using the standard Settings file to keep track of any user-specific settings, as well as providing their default values. Then, suppose you upgrade your application version and notice that all of the user settings have been reset to their default values! Why does this happen and what can you do about it? Continue reading

Using Types from .NET 4.5 Assemblies in VSTO 4 Projects

This blog post is about an interesting thing we’ve stumbled upon when we upgraded from Visual Studio 2012 RC to the RTM version. Basically, we are working on a customization for Microsoft Office 2010, and the customization integrates a bunch of Team Foundation Server 2012 features into the Office application. So, of course, we are using Visual Studio Tools for Office version 4.0 (VSTO4) for the customization and the Team Explorer 2012 client object model for the TFS integration. Continue reading

C#, Dynamic XML and jQuery – Oh, my!

C#, Dynamic XML and jQuery – Oh, my!

Oddly enough, not a week after Jason Zander announced that Visual Studio 2012 is ready to RTM, was that I started playing around with a very interesting C# feature that shipped with Visual Studio 2010 and the .NET framework 4. Yes, I’m talking about the C# dynamic type and yes, I know that it’s been there for some time for me to discover. I just never really had to time to examine it into some finer detail – until now. If you know me or have read any of my posts, you surely know that although I consider myself a C# developer, I’m no stranger to JavaScript and the jQuery library. Continue reading

Stacked bar graphs inside SharePoint list views

Stacked bar graphs inside SharePoint list views

Last week I wrote about an easy way to render bar graphs inside your SharePoint list views, as a way to visually enhance how the data is presented. This week, we are taking things a step further and are going to embed stacked bar graphs using SharePoint Designer 2010 and the XsltListViewWebPart. Although it may not seem like it should be a problem to implement something like this (especially if you’ve read the previous post), I’ve come to realize that there are a lot of small gotchas while trying to implement this feature. This is exactly why I’d like to share some of the problems I’ve encountered and to offer a few solutions or workarounds. Continue reading

Displaying data using bar graphs inside your SharePoint list views

Displaying data using bar graphs inside your SharePoint list views

It’s time for another blog post about one of those nice things you can accomplish using only SharePoint Designer and without doing any custom development. I’m talking about visually enhancing your list views by customizing the XSL stylesheet that the XsltListViewWebPart uses to render the list view in the browser. Continue reading

Consuming Twitter data using SharePoint Designer, Part 2

Alright, it’s time to pick up where we’ve left of with the first part of the series about Consuming Twitter data with SharePoint Designer 2010 and without using any code. If you still haven’t, I encourage you to read the previous post before continuing with this post, as things will make much more sense then. Continue reading

Consuming Twitter data using SharePoint Designer, Part 1

Consuming Twitter data using SharePoint Designer

Today we are going to talk about something I find rather interesting, and that’s integrating a REST-based web service (such as Twitter) into your SharePoint portal. What’s also interesting is that we are going to accomplish this without writing any code and by using only SharePoint Designer. Continue reading

Creating a SharePoint Theme using a PowerPoint Template

Creating a SharePoint Theme using a PowerPoint Template

Changing the site theme is one of the simplest possible ways of branding your SharePoint 2010 or SharePoint Online site. Regardless of whether you simply don’t like the default theme that comes when provisioning a new site or whether you want your SharePoint sites to use your corporate colors, creating and using a custom theme is a handy feature since you don’t need any tech skills and it can be done quite fast, once you know how. Another great reason why one might resort to creating a custom theme is that it can all be done using your browser and a Microsoft Office application of your choice. This blog post will get you up to speed on how to create a custom theme using Microsoft PowerPoint. Continue reading

Understanding how the Team WebAccess burndown chart works, Part 3

If you have been following my mini-series on understanding the TFS11 burndown chart, surely you know that in this blog post we are going to analyze how Team WebAccess calculates the ideal and actual burndown trend lines. Just as a quick recap, here’s what we’ve learned so far. In part one of the series, we have discovered how to construct a query expression which would retrieve the work items that can be used for calculating the burndown chart data for a specified iteration. Then, in part two, we’ve made good use of this query expression by using it to execute historical queries for each day in the iteration duration and to retrieve the remaining work for the specified iteration day.

This blog post is the third and final part, where we’ll see how the trend lines are calculated and why they are used. If you still haven’t read the first two posts, I’d really encourage you to go through them, as this blog post will make a lot more sense. You can find the posts here: part one, part two. Continue reading